College Student - When/where do I begin?

College Student - When/where do I begin?

Postby Moonpie » Tue Mar 16, 2010 5:39 am

Hello everyone, I am a college junior who is interested in applying for a commission in the Information Warfare community. My graduation will take place in May 2011, but I am unsure as to when I should begin the process to apply for a commission. Is there a better month or quarter during the year to apply? Is this a rolling admission process?

Thank you.
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Postby jsmcmurrayjr » Tue Mar 16, 2010 6:19 am

To apply, you'll have to submit an application to a board. Boards meet monthly (more or less).

You might want to check out BDCP, which pays you as an E3 while you're finishing your degree.

The best place to begin is by calling your local Officer (not enlisted) Recruiter.

Also check out [url]usnavyocs.com[/url] for a lot of good info on the application process.
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Postby Pwlk » Tue Mar 16, 2010 2:23 pm

Moonpie wrote:Hello everyone, I am a college junior who is interested in applying for a commission in the Information Warfare community. My graduation will take place in May 2011, but I am unsure as to when I should begin the process to apply for a commission. Is there a better month or quarter during the year to apply? Is this a rolling admission process?

Thank you.


Hi Moonpie -

I was in your same shoes a while back. I had little to no knowledge of the process or much of anything military related.

Take the advice jsmcmurrayjr gives you, especially the part about finding an Officer Recruiter as soon as possible.

In the meantime, I kept a very verbose journal of my journey from finding out about Information Warfare at a university career fair to Final Select. I invite you to skim it over. Once you have a good general idea about the process, sites like this and USNavyOCS.com are outstanding resources for specific questions.

blog (w/ bdcp tags): http://www.pwlk.net/blog/tag/bdcp/
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Postby Moonpie » Tue Mar 16, 2010 2:52 pm

Thanks for responding. It sounds like the BDCP program would be applicable to me even with just two semesters remaining?
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Postby jsmcmurrayjr » Tue Mar 16, 2010 2:58 pm

Moonpie wrote:Thanks for responding. It sounds like the BDCP program would be applicable to me even with just two semesters remaining?


I pretty sure it does. I'd not be surprised that from the Navy's perspective it's better than you applying as a sophomore since it's less they have to pay you while you're studying. Keep in mind that the application process can be very long (took me over a year, all told), so start now.

One thing you can do to speed it up is start figuring out where your medical paperwork is. You'll be asked to provide documentation of nearly anything medically significant that's ever happened to you, even things like broken bones during middle school. It can take a lot of time to get it all together.
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Postby Pwlk » Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:10 pm

jsmcmurrayjr wrote:One thing you can do to speed it up is start figuring out where your medical paperwork is. You'll be asked to provide documentation of nearly anything medically significant that's ever happened to you, even things like broken bones during middle school. It can take a lot of time to get it all together.


This and thinking about who you would like to write letters of recommendation. You will need at least three.
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Postby Moonpie » Tue Mar 16, 2010 4:51 pm

jsmcmurrayjr wrote:I pretty sure it does. I'd not be surprised that from the Navy's perspective it's better than you applying as a sophomore since it's less they have to pay you while you're studying. Keep in mind that the application process can be very long (took me over a year, all told), so start now.

One thing you can do to speed it up is start figuring out where your medical paperwork is. You'll be asked to provide documentation of nearly anything medically significant that's ever happened to you, even things like broken bones during middle school. It can take a lot of time to get it all together.


I can get started on the medical paper work now. Would having my appendix removed be medically significant? Other than my wisdom teeth being removed, that's the only surgery I've had.

What about records from a school psychologist? I had to see one of those when I was in 6th grade.
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Postby jsmcmurrayjr » Tue Mar 16, 2010 9:03 pm

Moonpie wrote:I can get started on the medical paper work now. Would having my appendix removed be medically significant? Other than my wisdom teeth being removed, that's the only surgery I've had.

What about records from a school psychologist? I had to see one of those when I was in 6th grade.


All of the above except maybe seeing the psychologist. Having your appendix and wisdom teeth removed won't be a problem, you'll just need documentation. If it really doesn't exist, you'll have to write a letter explaining that despite your best efforts, you couldn't get ahold of anything.

If the psychologist didn't diagnose you with anything (e.g. if your parents wondered if you had ADD but you didn't), you won't need it. Keep in mind, though, I'm not a recruiter.

It seemed to me that for most of my history, anyways, they just wanted to have on record that it happened. My medical history is fairly complex, but the only thing I had to worry about was my eyesight (which required a waiver - not a big deal).

By the way, does anybody know if my eyesight (hypermyopic) will keep me off of subs in the future?
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Postby Mack » Wed Mar 17, 2010 12:02 am

I am not a doctor but used to be a submariner. In general, you can't deploy on subs if you have a condition that the independant duty hospitalman aboard the sub can't treat in an emergency if something goes wrong to keep you stable long enough to get you off the sub for real treatment. I googled your condition and I would consider retinal detachment in this category since it requires emergency surgery to prevent blindness and the hospitalman cannot do it. However, there seems to be a medical waiver for almost everything, assuming your condition is stable and not expected to get worse in the underway environment. The only way to know for sure would be to talk to a flight surgeon about your medical specifics.
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Postby jsmcmurrayjr » Fri Mar 19, 2010 8:36 pm

My condition is stable as far as I know.

I did have to get a waiver to get into OCS. I've got a few months of OCS and IWBC (and maybe OHARP) before it'll even maybe be an issue anyways.

Sorry for the threadjack.
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